A Photographic Journey: Scotland

Scotland is a big place. There is so much to see, always not enough time to explore them all. When I visited Scotland for the first time, it was mainly for my photographic assignments and partially a wanderlust to explore the region. Driving from Glasgow through parts of the Scottish highlands and around to Edinburgh, I’ve seen the magical landscapes of the highlands, bewitching castles, rugged coastlines, whisky, wildlife and of course, the friendly locals. On my second visit was purely for holiday as I brought my folks around. It was also a second chance for me to return back to places I have missed before.

This article documents my experiences in Scotland and some of my favourite images I have captured in this region, presented in a narrative order. These journeys were truly once in a lifetime experience. If you have never been to Scotland highlands or want to but haven’t got the time, it is time you should really consider!

 

Huge windmills looked like miniature toys from above. When the weather is good, you can see a lot of details of the landscape from the plane windows.

 

An aerial view of Glasgow city, where the second longest river in Scotland, River Clyde flows through the city in the distance.

 

A street scene from St Vincent street, Glasgow city.

 

St George’s Tron, Church of Scotland from West George road. Glasgow has a rich and varied architectural heritage. It’s wealthy past has also left a legacy of the finest Victorian architecture in the UK.

 

Buchanan Street is Glagow’s main pedestrianised shopping street where there is no shortage of mega malls, well-known brand names and speciality shopping. As the largest retail centre in the UK outside London, all lined with big names you’d expect from the great British high street.

 

Glasgow has been consistently voted as the top place to shop in the UK outside London’s west end. The cobbled streets and lanes are where you will find a mix of vintage stores and independent boutiques.

 

High end retail shopping mall, truly a shopaholics’ paradise!

 

Visiting the carnival during the summer are some of the favourite activities for the children.

 

A family patronises a candy stall. Notice their shirts had the same colour as the stall.

 

A twelve-year old Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky in a Stag shaped decanter on oak wooden  stand, spotted in a souvenir shop in Glasgow.

 

Tarbet lies on the west shore of Loch Lomond some two thirds of the way towards its northern end. When driving out of Glasgow and into the highlands, many people tend to overlook this interesting and attractive location as they simply see Tarbet as a passing, en route to even more spectacular scenery. The weather was ridiculously good that day and I just had to stop by to enjoy the picturesque scenery of Loch Lomond.

 

As Elvish as it may sound, the Falls of Lora is actually a tidal rapid, a popular destination for kayakers and divers as well as a stunning sight for visitors and photographers watching the eddies and swirling waters. Connel Bridge is a cantilever bridge that spans Loch Etive at Connel Village. Interestingly, there was never such a person called “Lora”.

 

I loved the beautiful pastel colours of the sunset as I happened to pass by Oban. As a small resort town, Oban is protected by the island of Kerrera and beyond Kerrera, the Isle of Mull.

 

The water in Oban bay is clear enough to see marine creatures from the harbour. We spotted a handful of fishes and moon jellyfish, a common jellyfish found in many estuaries and harbours in the UK.

 

The brilliant sunset at Connel made us stay longer than we intended. We got hungry decided to try out some food at the Oyster Inn restaurant nearby. By our experience, it has excellent food and services.

 

Fish and Chips from Oyster Inn Restaurant in Connel. In my humble opinion, this is by far the best chips I have ever tasted, beating Norwich Grosvenor chips and Manhatten fish Market (which I still loved), even the chips in Portree, Cromer and London, hands down. I think its because the batter on the fish was done differently. Perhaps it was a special cooking oil. But whatever it is, if you have the chance to pass by this area, I recommend giving it a try.

 

A pot of steamed mussels in coconut milk and chilli. I know, it sounds like a weird combination for mussels with coconut milk, but it was delicious to our taste. We’ve tried mussels of other flavours in other parts of Scotland and still think coconut milk was a great combination. I’d probably try and find the recipe online and see if my mum to cook it at home.

 

The Corran Ferry crosses Loch Linnhe at the Corran Narrows. We stopped by this little area to take a breather as we head up north towards Fort William.

 

New housing structures were being built along the coast of Corran, most likely accommodation from a nearby inn. Against the backdrop of the mountains on a sunny day, it sure looked as though we were in another exotic place such as Hawaii or New Zealand.

 

If you are a Harry Potter fan, you would be familiar with the Hogwarts express train scenes. Glenfinnan is where those train scenes are located. The train passes through the viaduct at a regular intervals everyday. I didn’t had the time to explore paths near the viaduct though.

 

Glenfinnan is a small village with many paths linking the village to the loch and the viaduct. It is possible to walk everywhere but it will require some time to explore them. Above the visitor centre is a vantage point which most visitors would hike up to. It is possible to go higher up a little beyond the designated vantage point to where I took this photo.

 

A memorial tower was erected here in Glenfinnan in tribute to the Jacobite clansmen who fought and died in the cause of Prince Charles Edward Stuart. However, the statue of an anonymous highlander, commonly referred to at the point of commission as Charles Edward Stewart, was added much later.

 

A beautiful stag was spotted near the Glenfinnan monument. Much care was taken not to go too near to the animal.

 

Fort William is the second largest settlement in the Highlands of Scotland. It is a centre for hillwalking and climbing due to its proximity to Ben Nevis, the tallest mountain in the UK. You can put your feet up in a cosy traditional pub and enjoy a distinctly flavoured Highland single malt or even a traditional ale straight from the local brewery. You can also indulge in the local delicacies at shops, cafés and restaurants along the High Street.

 

Halfway up Scotland, I met a Scottish busker performing with his bagpipe and apparently he sells his own CD albums.

 

Once during my journey midway, I was stopped by a patrol police. As with the drivers before me, I was asked to pull over one side to allow an incoming vehicle to pass through. I complied, not knowing what happened initially. A while later, as it turns out, a long vehicle appeared from the opposite side. It carried a huge blade-like object, which looked like the wings of an aircraft. Just as I thought that was it, two more vehicles appeared. As I continued my journey though the next harbour town, it then occurred to me that these long wing-like objects where actually windmill blades!

 

The thing about staying in the highlands is that I always preferred accommodations that are slightly off the beaten track. It is more quiet and tranquil, which gives me more opportunity to relax and enjoy the view of the highlands in isolation. This accommodation in Ratagan is a perfect choice, with friendly staff and well maintained facility. Its slightly challenging to get to this neighbourhood though.

 

Common dinning room of my accommodation in Ratagan. Although the facilities here were basic, but they were really well maintained!

 

Part of the mountains which make up the Five Sisters of Kintail. When I showed this image to the folks in UK, many were impressed by the mood and atmosphere I was able to capture. Some suggestions I received on improving the image was to add a human element in the landscape, to which I appreciate the feedback, but not feasible in this case.

 

You see, these mountain peaks were actually shot from Ratagan, across Loch Duich, which is at least two miles apart. To include a human element in the shot would be quite difficult and dangerous.

 

Low tide over Loch Duich. This fantastic view is right outside my accommodation in Ratgan!

 

Eilean Donan Castle perches on a tidal island where three sea lochs meet. It is without a doubt one of the most popular visitor attractions in the Highlands. It is also recognised as an official James Bond location. I remembered the fourth time I passed by this castle, I saw a glimpse of golden light of sunset. Unfortunately I had to rush back to my next pit stop and wasn’t able to capture the magical light. Eilean Donan’s setting is truly breath-taking.

 

The bridge to Isle of Skye from Loch Alsh Viewpoint. There are many viewpoints around Scotland highlands roads where you will be able to pull over to one side and admire the scenic views. The only thing is that you can easily drive past the viewpoint without realising and miss it altogether.

 

The lonely road ahead. The Old man of Storr can be seen in the distance. These roads look like suitable for racing like the Fast and Furious. Over here, the clouds changes very quickly. With the unpredictable weather conditions, and sheep, much care must be taken when driving along these roads.

 

The Old man of Storr is a rocky hill on the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle of Skye in Scotland. Famous for its magnificent scenery and views, the Old Man of Storr is a popular hotspot for hikers, hill walkers and photographers. It is also the location where the opening scenes of Ridley Scotts’ Prometheus was shot.

 

This gigantic pinnacle is called the Old man of Storr. Twice I have visited here, and twice I had not been able to hike past this spot. The first attempt was due to the in-coming morning fog and I felt my safety would be compromised as no one was around with me  at the time, and i had no map and compass. The second attempt was due to raining clouds and high winds which discouraged me from hiking further up.

 

This was the spot where the steep trail splits into two directions: one eastwards and the other westwards. The Needle Rock is where the eastward trail begins. I regret not being able to advance further from here as the conditions were not favourable to me.

 

Loch Mealt is an inland fresh-water loch. The viewpoint is located close to the sea and its eastern side comprises of the spectacular tall sea-cliffs of Kilt Rock, a dramatic waterfall created from the outflow of Loch Mealt.

 

The cliff edges of Loch Mealt and the Kilt rocks are pretty well fenced, but visitors should take particular care in walking near the edge.

 

It was summer time and I did thought of setting up my tent outside. The temperatures were cold in the morning, and I thought I could endure that. But when I saw how much midges there were, I changed my mind.

 

Loch Mealt with Beinn Edra in the background. Days like this its hard to predict how heavy the rain will fall. Better to head back early than getting stuck outside with low visibility.

 

Two visitors standing  on the cliff of Lealt Falls looking over the coast.

 

Lealt Falls from above the first viewpoint where you can look into the depths of the gorge and see the waterfall finding its way down the gorge. The trail has no fences so it can be quite dangerous when there are high winds. There are more sights to see at the bottom of the gorge, but I didn’t have enough time to explore.

 

A view of Uig village from vantage point. So I took the wrong turn at Portree and reached Uig instead. As I followed through route A855, driving up the narrow path at such a great height can be a frightening experience. I continued my journey through the same route and only to find out later that I had driven around the whole isle and back to Portree, missing out the Quiraing.

 

The adventure of driving around the Isle of Skye and not knowing exactly where I am. I happened to find some cattle grazing on top of the hill at a random location which made me stopped my car. Unfortunately, it wasn’t a highland cow. I didn’t manage to see any throughout my trips.

 

The colourful town of Portree is the largest “small town” in the Isle of Skye. It’s the ideal base to explore sights around the island.

 

Portree is also a natural harbour, and the shape of this rugged coastline of peninsulas and bays, sea arches and stalks, has been likened to a lobster’s claw and is rich with wildlife. With the unpredictable weather conditions in the highlands, the view of its surrounding landscapes are always different every day.

 

Street lights reflected onto the boats moored at Portree harbour as the clouds cleared at twilight, offering a contrast of colours.

 

Morning breakfast at Café Arriba, Portree, Isle of Skye. Its menu changes every once in a while, and I was deeply saddened this delicious burrito was no longer available on my second visit.

 

Langoustines, or scampi, at the Sea Breezes Restaurant, Portree. They’re basically delectable mini lobsters.

 

Fish and Chips at the Sea Breezes Restaurant, Portree.

 

Have you tried a venison steak before? We had one for diner at the Portree Hotel. It was delicious!

 

Chargrilled Cod fillet, Creamy Mushroom Gnocchi and Crispy Onions at the Portree Hotel.

 

Lunch at Seuma’s Bar, Sligachan was delicious!

 

Lunch at Seuma’s Bar, Sligachan was delicious!

 

The Sligachan Bridge is on the main road to Portree, in the heart of the Cuillins. It is situated at the junction of the roads from Portree, Dunvegan and Broadford. The hotel was built in around 1830 at this road junction. Many early climbers chose this as a spot to start their ascents of the Cuillin. Today there is also a campsite and bunkhouse adjacent to the hotel. There is also a small microbrewery, which is operated in the same building as the hotel.

 

I was inspired to visit this location because of the works of a British photographer, Julian Calverley, as well as a brilliant Johnny Walker ad made by two students. Legend has it that if you dip your face in the river water by the Sligachan Bridge, you will be granted eternal beauty.

 

The Sligachan trails are long. There are two hiking trails towards different directions with no circular paths, yet both trails offer stunning views of the peaks of the Cuillin. The Cuillin is a range of rocky mountains dominating the landscape on Skye: the Black Cuillin and the Red Cuillin separated by Glen Sligachan.

 

The iconic ridge of the Black Cuillin is considered as one of UK’s most challenging mountain range.

 

Marsco, a red Cullin mountain. Red Cuillin hills are lower and, being less rocky, have fewer scrambles or climbs.

 

Waterfalls along the Sligachan trail.

 

Can you imagine playing Pokemon Go in this setting?

 

My longest hike at the Sligachan trail was only up to about 7th klick, and then back to the starting point. If you can see a tiny white peck near the horizon, that is the Sligachan hotel, the starting point of the trail. I had only brought a litre of water with me.

 

An interesting view of a neighbourhood in Sligachan; a patch of trees amidst the seemingly barren land.

 

The weather had been ridiculously good that afternoon. As we drove out of Isle of Skye through the Skye bridge, we were treated to a stunning view of the bridge and its surrounding water. The nearest village Kyle of Lochalsh is visible from where the Skye Bridge. On foreground is actually a tiny island called Eilean Bàn.

 

A woman walks through the coast of Stonehaven with her dog on a windy day. Stonehaven is a pretty harbour town south of Aberdeen, famous for its Hogmanay fireballs ceremony. The storm had just passed and the winds were high, I stopped by this little town out of curiosity.

 

On the way down from the highlands, we chanced upon a wine distillery called the Dalwhinnie Distillery. We stopped by to take a look at the visitors centre for a short while. I was driving, so couldn’t taste a bit of whisky.

 

Dalwhinnie is the highest distillery in Scotland, at 1,164 feet above sea level. The name Dalwhinnie is derived from the Gaelic language, meaning ‘meeting place’, referring to the meeting of ancient cattle drovers’ routes through the mountains.

 

Limited edition Dalwhinnie whisky bottle on display. Quite tempting to buy a bottle of whisky back, but unfortunately our baggage had limited space.

 

Mannochmore 12 Years Old Flora & Fauna, surprisingly clean, dry and refreshingly direct, which makes it a good apéritif. Auchroisk 10 Years Old Flora & Fauna, an apéritif whisky, pleasant and light, which opens sweet, fresh and balanced then dries to a short finish.

 

An interesting drinking apparatus on display.

 

A special released, limited edition Dalwhinnie 1989, 25 year old bottle on display. Deliciously fruity, with notes of plum, greengage, strawberries and melon, and a touch of toast and liquorice.

 

One can hear the sound of the sheep’s call from the wine distillery, only to realise a heard of sheep right beside the wine distillery!

 

Our next pit stop was Perth, Scotland. It took us a while to figure out the location our accommodation was actually inside the University of the Highlands and Islands Perth College. As it turns out, these apartments were let out during the summer break as the college students would have gone away for holiday. How cool is that?

 

Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland. It is a city with amazing views, hidden courtyards, secret gardens and stunning architectural details to be discovered almost everywhere you look. Here is a skyline of the old town of Edinburgh.

 

The most common way of visiting Edinburgh from London is through the train. Edinburgh Waverley railway station is the principal station serving Edinburgh. It is believed to be the only railway station named after a work of fiction.

 

This Scott Monument is a Victorian Gothic monument to Scottish author Sir Walter Scott. It has a series of viewing platforms reached by a series of narrow spiral staircases giving panoramic views of central Edinburgh and its surroundings. It is the largest monument to a writer in the world.

 

The New Town contains Edinburgh’s main shopping streets. Princes Street is home to many chain shops, as well as Jenners departmental store, an Edinburgh institution.

 

Beautiful interiors of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. The art museum holds the national collections of portraits, all of which are of, but not necessarily by, Scots. The museum’s collection totals some 3,000 paintings and sculptures, 25,000 prints and drawings, and 38,000 photographs.

 

Let’s Circus performing in the city. The Edinburgh castle stands proudly in the background.

 

From outside, the Tartan Weaving Mill looks like just another souvenir shop in an old mill house. But  once inside, my goodness, it is really a labyrinth!

 

The Royal Mile is the name given to a succession of streets forming the main thoroughfare of the Old Town of the city of Edinburgh in Scotland. It runs downhill between Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace. The Royal Mile is the busiest tourist street in the Old Town, perhaps rivalled only by Princes Street in the New Town.

 

The Royal Mile especially the higher end near the castle, has many tourist-oriented shops selling Scottish souvenirs from postcards to whisky and kilts.

 

The streets which make up the Royal Mile are Castlehill, the Lawnmarket, the High Street, the Canongate and Abbey Strand. During the annual Edinburgh Festival, the High Street becomes crowded with tourists, entertainers and buskers.

 

It is common to see buskers performing with Scottish bagpipes. Here, a pair of buskers performs with harp and flute on the streets.

 

Near the Edinburgh castle is the The Scotch Whisky Experience, a visitor attraction  which offers tours and whisky tutoring sessions, alongside a shop, corporate spaces and Amber Restaurant & Whisky Bar. On the first occasion I visited, the streets were so crowded I couldn’t get in. The second time I came back up, I had not been told that the streets were closed due to some major event going on. I never got taste the scotch whiskies..

 

A view of Edinburgh city from Holywood park, a short walk from the city centre. There can’t be many cities with a volcano (albeit dormant) slap bang in the centre, but Edinburgh is one such place. During summer time, the last light could be near 11pm.

 

A brilliant sunset over Edinburgh city, from the Salisbury Crag in Holyrood park.

 

Carlton Hill in a distance. When the weather is clear, the Forth Road Bridge connecting Edinburgh can be seen over the horizon.

 

Ahhhh, Zavenya!!!!

 

Edinburgh city at twilight, from the Salisbury Crag in Holyrood park.

 

In attempt to capture the evening skyline from another vantage point, here is a view of the old town of Edinburgh city from Carlton hill.

 

The city lights lit up at twilight invokes a mystical feel of the Edinburgh city. Here, You can see peaks jutting out of the horizon. It is called the Lomond hills, also known locally as “Paps of Fife”.

 

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There Are Places I Remember

Spending two years of my time studying in the UK has been an amazing journey. Not only have I had the opportunity to explore many new places, but have also experienced new cultures and made many new friends. In this series contains the various places I have visited within the UK which have now become a part of my memories. The intention of curating this series is not about seeking out touristy locations in the effort to put my own artistic spin on the area, but more as a means to record my personal experience of visiting these places as to how I would remember them. The significance of it is that I would not have the chance to revisit those places again after returning back to Singapore.

I have not really explored the UK landscape extensively throughout my two years stay because half the time was spent working on my photography assignments and based in Norwich most of the time. Sometimes I would take a breather from my stressful schedule and head out for a walk outside my home or travel out of the city to nearby places with friends. It is only through such opportunities that I was able to capture landscapes scenes that were outside my assignment works.

At first, I didn’t know how to group them as all the images seem to be in different approaches and all over the place. I feel that every image captured are visually strong as an individual as I have tried to build every image its own narrative. Sometimes I would be influenced by images that motivated me to edit them in a certain mood, sometimes I would capture these scenes street photography-style with no particular concept in mind, pretty much like Henri-Cartier Bresson.

This series of 36 images arranged more according to places I have been to, but by no means in chronological order.

Norwich

Norwich is the city I was based in during my time in the UK. There are many parts of the city I have explored over the four seasons and I have come to fall in love with the largely quiet environment away from the city centre. This was the place I have also made my photography works with my housemates and photography peers, many of which I have had fond memories of.

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The “Bag Lady” of Norwich, in contrast with the largest cathedral in Norfolk. This was one of the first few images taken during my first walkabout exploring the city.

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Eaton Park during the early winter months, a quiet environment away from bustling city centre and the lovely landscape as the seasons change. A dad and his teenage child exit out of the colonnade pavilion and I saw the symmetricity of the building structure against the barren trees was yet another photo opportunity.

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A distinctive view of the city centre from the Norwich Castle one autumn evening while searching for vantage points. It has been a rainy week, yet I was able to see glowing rays of light piercing through as the cloud break. The Norwich City Town Council is where the clock tower stands.

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A cherry tree blossoms at the arrival of spring, taken outside my neighbourhood. Spring is my busiest period and I hardly have the time to properly look at these spring flowers. Yet when I do get the time, I appreciate the fact that it was my first time seeing them up close.

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Throughout my entire stay in the UK, I have lived near the second largest Roman Catholic cathedral in England. As it was a huge landmark, it was pretty easy navigating my way back home from the city centre even late at night. Every day I get to see different facets of its stunning exterior as the lighting conditions differ almost throughout all four seasons. Yet not once have I entered its premise. This was the first image of the cathedral I had captured but didn’t publish. The view of the cathedral building has etched onto my memory so much that I wanted to capture the building in my ideal light condition before my departure. I wanted to revisit the shoot again but later realised I hardly found the time to revisit due to my hectic schedule, even though I still pass by everyday… 

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A view of the Wensum river flowing through the city centre one evening after the rain had subsided. A warm glow appeared as the sun sets behind the clouds, creating a beautiful palette of colours of the scene. This was one of the rare moments I felt I was at the right place at the right time.

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When time allows, I would often climb up Mousehold Heath with my camera to capture the amazing view of the city; sometimes on bright sunny days, sometimes on wet rainy days with high winds, other times on cold freezing winter days. St James’ hill is arguably the highest vantage point I could find in Norwich. It is a popular viewpoint on bonfire night or whenever there are fireworks exhibitions from the centre of Norwich. In this image, I found an old couple, photography enthusiasts, capturing the magnificent sunset. I was there too.

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December is the time when shopping streets would be decorated with mesmerizing Christmas lights and displays. This is a corner of a shopping street in the city centre I would pass by almost every day.  This was an attempt at capturing a scene of the festive mood during the blue hour. Notice that there were two Christmas trees on two levels of the building, one in a lighted room, and the other in a dark room.

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On Guy Fawkes night, also known as the bonfire night is an annual commemoration often celebrate at large organised events with extravagant firework displays. I went up the St James’ hill to capture the fireworks. I originally wanted to capture those fireworks in contrast with the crowd in the foreground, but unfortunately, I could not manoeuvre in time as the spot become rather crowded and the fireworks ended much quicker than I expected. Following the aftermath of the fireworks display, most people would have descended back to the city. I decided to turn my camera around to look for interesting results if any.

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Winter months are usually warm and mild in Norwich as snowing is a rare occurrence. When it does, many folks would have gone berserk at the sight of it. Yet one early morning was the heaviest snowfall I had seen. Having not seen any proper snowfall in my life, I was absolutely excited about it. Treading on snow in my boots for my first time was an amazing experience. Except that day was also the deadline of my assignments and I had not slept the night before, so I had not been able to properly document the wintery wonderland. However, I managed to snag one image of the snow at one of the campuses of Norwich University of the Arts, after my submission.

Great Yarmouth 

Great Yarmouth is a coastal town in Norfolk. I’m glad to have the opportunity to visit the small town on a couple of occasions because I have had some friends living there. This was taken on my first visit to the town centre during my summer break, a wide, pedestrianised avenue leading all the way from the town centre to the seafront. Despite many negative opinions for a non-local to visit that region, I found that exploring the main street to be a rather pleasant experience.

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An old couple resting on a bench in front of a local candy shop.

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Strolling along the marine parade, exploring the sights while waiting for my friend to turn up. A scene of a takeaway food stall along the promenade near the pier.

Cromer/Sheringham

Cromer and Sheringham are yet another coastal towns in Norfolk which I had visited, particularly for its Norfolk coastal path with a group of international friends. I have enjoyed the hiking experience as well as the fresh fish and chips from the local restaurants. Yet I remembered my first visit there was due to a project collaboration work that enabled me to visit places outside Norwich city for the first time since my arrival.

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A scene in Sheringham, where the start of our hiking towards Cromer begins.

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The promenade in Sheringham, during my first visit to the coastal town for project work. It was a windy and cloudy day.

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Rocks and rails along Sheringham beach during the summer time

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Hiking towards Cromer from Sheringham, the first challenge was to climb up what the locals call the Beeston Bump. It was a picturesque walk along the cliffs, especially on a bright and sunny day.

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Strong light and shadows casting over the coast, adding vibrant colours to the cliffs and landscape. Things like this make me excited about exploring places through the tourist’s eyes.

Cambridge

Cambridge is about 1.5 drive from Norwich and I have only been to Cambridge twice. The first time was for the punting tour during the summer break, and the second time I explored one of the university campus grounds over the Easter break. Yet twice is not enough to warrant a total familiarity of the university city, as there were much more parts of the city I had not explored. Nevertheless, I had thoroughly enjoyed the experiences on both trips.

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The Corpus Christi College is one of my favourite part of the university campus to photograph, as stripes of green lawn are particularly striking against the blue sky. It is also perhaps one of the more iconic spots in Cambridge photographed by visitors.

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Marketplace in the city centre of Cambridge, taken from a high vantage point. I loved this vantage point as it shows a section of the city in an overview.

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An evening light hits part of the Corpus Christi College, framed by the entrance hall. It reminded me of the iconic Taj Mahal as framed by its entrance gate.

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A scene of a punting tour along the River Cam, a popular activity in Cambridge especially during the summertime.

Nottingham

The only reason I had been to Nottingham was due to a visitation to an art exhibition at the Nottingham Contemporary gallery during the Christmas period with a group of international friends. It was a great opportunity as not only I toured the exhibition but also had been able to explore the Christmas market at the city centre.

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Outskirts of Nottingham town, on a train ride. A new neighbourhood is under construction.

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Crossing the road outside the Nottingham train station and towards the city centre.

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A scene of the Christmas market at daytime, taken from a vantage point. It was my first time visiting a Christmas market as I have never seen a similar market in Norwich. Looking at the crowd, I could not imagine just how much people would have visited the Nottingham Christmas market.

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It gets a lot livelier as night falls. The insane crowd meant it was harder to get around and I had to choose my vantage point beforehand. The night activity here is definitely a lot different from that of Norwich during the festive period.

Manchester

I never got to fully explore Manchester city as I was only in the area for a day with my travel buddy after our Scotland leg. He was there for personal matters while I spent the entire day touring the Manchester United stadium. The funny thing about this experience was that I was too naive to think I could walk all the way to Old Trafford from Victoria Station and back, assuming that the distance would be similar to Norwich. I was dead wrong, and I found it the hard way. Half the day was spent under the hot sun figuring my way around and then went on the stadium tour.

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This image was taken at the Old Trafford station while on my way back to the city centre via the metro tube as I became hardpressed for time to catch a train back to Norwich that evening. It was a good weather and I loved the view of the cityscape from the station platform. In the end, it only took me a mere 15 mins to reach the city centre. Apart from the images of the stadium tour, I did not take any photos of the city due to the fact that I had mismanaged my time.

London

When coming to the UK, one should visit London city at least once. As one of the most visited cities in the world, London is half a size larger than Singapore. It is busy, vibrant and there is really a lot to see.  Yet in the light of the recent terror attacks in London, one cannot help but have security concerns about the terror threat. With two hours train ride from Norwich, I seldom arrange a full day trip to the city unless I have specific matters to do there. Expenditure in London can also be relatively quite expensive. I can remember I have visited London in at least five occasions.

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This scene was taken on the tube station platform of Hoxton, a district East of London. The cloudiness in the sky is a typical weather in the UK. From this vantage point, I could see parts of the metropolitan and parts with construction works. Then there is the London tube coming towards the train station.

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The morning rush in Stratford, a district east of London. Commuters were heading towards the railway station or the bus interchange. Whenever I pass by this area, I would be awestruck by the beautiful decors of the shopping centre. I arrived early in London that day to see to some print matters and captured this scene as a remembrance.

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Due to the heavy congestions in London, many locals here choose to travel by either the tube or bicycles. Cycling is a great way to save money on travel expenses, explore the city and get some exercises at the same time. There are cyclist lanes everywhere in London and even the roads can get pretty congested with cyclists during peak hours. Here is a street scene along Westminister bridge.

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The Orangery, in the Kew Gardens. I made Kew Gardens a top priority during my first visit to London during my summer break. This was partially due to the influence of Sir Attenborough in his three-part documentary series, “Kingdom of Plants”. The Kew garden is a huge and beautiful place, very much different from the Singapore Botanical gardens. I pick this image because apart from the usual garden photos we are expected from the garden, I wanted to show the garden from a different perspective; although I could have picked other images from my collection. In this case, it was the scene of the visitors resting after a day’s tour, but signs of plants visible and the airy structural building, hopefully, enough to suggest what the place is.

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One London Bridge is a high quality refurbished office building located right beside the London Bridge. I was attracted by the unique design of the building and the particularly reflective surface of the office windows on a bright sunny day. This image would form a visual impression of a distinctive busy London office in my memory.

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The iconic St Paul’s Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral and the mother church of the Diocese of London. Beside the cathedral is a shopping mall with an accessible rooftop garden which one can view the breathtaking London skyline at any time of the day. After a couple of visits to this area, often in gloomy weather, I’m glad that I was finally able to capture the bright blue sky against the dome of St Paul’s, causing vibrant reflections on both sides of the window screens of the shopping mall. Unfortunately, I have not entered the cathedral as the entrance fee for visitors was too expensive for me.

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A moment in time at the Bank junction, the historical and financial centre of London, at which nine streets converge in the heart of the city. It is also where the Bank of England is located. Behind the Royal Exchange London stands the Leadenhall building, an office building iconic to the skyline of London. Nearby construction works were in underway for a new office tower.

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While exploring the Camden Town Market, a family looks for direction on where they are going to visit next.  This image was taken through a window on the second-floor vantage point.

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As the train heads towards Norwich from London central, a man glances out to see the London stadium. This scene sort of depicts my afterthoughts every time I travel back to Norwich after spending a day in London, even there are interesting scenes to see while on the way back. Parts of the ArcelorMittal Orbit can be seen on the right side of the window.

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Stairs leading to the basement floor of One New Change shopping mall. Apart from the classic shot of St Paul’s Cathedral, I found this image to be a distinctive part of the shopping scene in the One New Change, where shoppers are almost everywhere.

Other Contenders 

Curating images for this series has been a challenging process for me. There are some images that I felt could have been part of the series but falls short on certain elements. For me, having a coherent style or not wasn’t as important as selecting interesting visuals of places that had impacted me during my time in the UK. Instead, I took much care in arranging the series as a whole, not too much and not too little.  Here are some images that I felt did not make it to this series, I’m including them here as part of sharing my developmental process.

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Sheringham, taken from inside a coach. I thought this scene here kind of gives it a character, an impression of the busyness of the small town.

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When I first explored the Camden high street, I was intrigued to see that almost every lamppost has got banners on, enticing customers to patronise their shop due to its close proximity.

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Picadilly Circus, taken outside the metro station. being able to see these old building structures first hand is an awesome experience. but the fact that has become a crowded touristy spot and a shopping district, hence the omission of this image.

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London Chinatown. I enjoyed the experience of walking through familiarity, at least once.

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On my way back, I happen to chance upon a rather interesting architectural design of the Stratford ONE student accommodation by Unite Students. I thought there was very little narrative element in this image, hence the omission.

Conclusion

In my previous research which explores the concept of “The Provocative Landscape”, I investigated the representation of the landscape through the tourists’ eyes and question how images of cities and landscapes could provoke reactions and thus relate to these images from a personal perspective. As my journey in the UK has come to an end, it is then I realised the significance of these photographs I have captured during those two years. By adding the element of my own personal narrative to my images, I started to see how they could somehow come together as a series.

Developmental Process: Pandora’s Box

This series was based on the research done in BA3a, of conceptual artists and sculptors who have used mirrors in their works, as well as the influence of images and films who of Iceland. I decided to expand the series in tandem with the Allenmanstretten series. That is, I brought the mirror cube out to Iceland for a spin. In this post, I discuss the developmental process of how these imageries were achieved, in chronological order.

Preparation

There were many things I could not execute due to severe logistical constraints. Hence I took more of an experimental approach, in the sense if it works, it works. All these starts with the preparation of the mirror cube.

Contrary to popular believe, getting the mirror cube to Iceland was relatively easy because I was using the regular self-adhesive mirror tiles bought from Wilko, which was used in other photography projects earlier on. I  had only used 4 tiles to build the cube, as I want it to be as light-weight as I could carry, and also the lightest configuration I could lug around when I’m there. I only needed to show the sides where it would be photographed. It was necessary to ensure that it was packed comfortably into my check-in baggage. The other item I needed to bring along was duct tape. I would borrow scissors from the hostel staff.

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Equipment-wise, I used 5D MKIII and 16-35mm lens for all of the shoot for this series. I had the 5Ds as my second camera but it as meant for the telephoto lens. I didn’t plan to switch up my equipment because I didn’t want the elements to dirty the camera sensors if I had to change them on the ground.

The Iceland Trip

While packing these mirror tiles were relatively easy, setting it up was actually “difficult”. Firstly was because I arrived at my hostel in Reykjavik and I was immediately brought out to catch the Northern Lights. I didn’t have the time to unpack and set the mirrors, though I really wished I had. I didn’t know what to expect from the northern lights and I’m kicking myself for not setting up the mirrors. Secondly was because I was out the next day and I had to drive on to my next destination on the following day and then spend a night out in the car. It was exhausting and I didn’t have the chance to set it up until I was almost leaving my first hostel outside Reykjavik.

It was a good weather with plenty of the sunshine and blue sky, only a little windy. I wanted to seize the chance to set up my mirror cube for a couple of test shoots if I could. I went around the vicinity to scout for location and found a pile of gravel stone that might work in front of the mountain ridges. The idea was to find a stable, high ground vantage point. As I did a couple of test shots, the wind picked up and the mirrors kept falling. This became an early indicator that my cube was too light and not really suitable for shooting in the rugged terrain. So I moved on.

On post process, I felt that many of the shots from this scene could have worked well if I set up the mirror tiles properly. It seems bits of its interiors can be seen. Also, there was one frame where I thought it might have been able to work out better if I spend more time shifting my camera angle and the mirror cube to a more symmetrically and that the reflection of the mountain peak would become more prominent in the image.

I managed to get my cube up again much later when I had reached Vestrahorn in Hofn, due to my travelling schedule. The problem was, I was hit by a blizzard storm whilst driving towards Jokulsarlon glacier lagoon at night. As it was my first time experiencing such condition, I was both physically and mentally drained from the intense drive. I had only get on to Vestrahorn the next day after a full day’s rest at Hofn area.

While at Vestrahorn, I had a rough visual idea how I wanted the image to look like. It was cloudy that day, and I had recced the area until it was almost sunset and went out to try my luck. On the ground, the lighting conditions became more terrible. I came out of my car and set up my cube while other visitors were looking at me like I’m the mad Asian guy. At that point it didn’t matter to me which particular spot was the best since the landscape was so vast, I just randomly plot the cube at different positions and decided on the best stable composition before shooting. However, The lighting conditions were quite terrible and I didn’t like that the black sands were sticking onto my mirrors when I place them on the ground. I only took two exposures and immediately deemed it a failure.

It was only when I got back home for post process that I realised how wrong I was and I should have taken more exposures and explored much more while I was there. Do I call this a lucky shot? No, obviously there was some compositional planning before I took the image and I’m well aware of the unevenness of the mirror cube which I had to straighten it out before the shoot. But I’m still kicking myself for capturing only two exposures in this location.

The next location was at the Jokulsarlon glacier lagoon. This was on my way back eastwards towards Reykjavik, I just had to give the glacier lagoon a visit before I leave. However, the weather never improved. In fact, it got much wetter and colder with the intermittent pelting of tiny ice hail but not to the point of a snow blizzard. It was really frustrating that I had not been able to do much for this series as it was extremely challenging. At that point, I decided to “brave the storm” and see how it turns out.

There were a lot of small icebergs that were washed up on the shore. I spent a bit of time figuring out the best way to fit the mirrors and again, I picked a random spot, further away from the main tourist crowd. Everyone came to see the icebergs with their cameras, and I was the only schmuck who carried the mirror cube and cameras out. I did get many odd glances, but at leat one of the visitors thought I was trying something weird but interesting.

With the terrible weather, nothing looked great on my camera.  I went on to figure out if I could fiddle with the bits of ice and arrange them into a more “compositionally-pleasing” manner. And that was it before the rain came and I had run all the way back into my car.

The next one was done on the next day, my second last day because after spending the whole afternoon at the glacier lagoon, it took me almost 5 hours of drive to reach my last destination at Laugarvtan before heading back to Reykjavik. I reach my hostel at 12 midnight, exhausted. By this time it was the end of my Iceland journey and I was hell-bent on making these mirror cube series work by hook or by crook.

On my second last day, it got bright and sunny. I found a stable platform with vantage point. This was an ideal place to set up my mirror cube. I carefully aligned the cube with the straight path below and experimented with various height and angles. I was more careful not to reveal the mirror interiors this time. I took brackets exposures hoping one of them might work. A couple of visitors came by at different times and found the mirror cube to be strangely amusing until i explained to them it was meant for Uni work.

During the last week of the Easter break, I had the chance to head out to Thetford forest for a walk. I decided to take the mirror cube out for a walk. It was a huge forest and I didn’t know where to start. I just pick a random part of the forest, along Brandon Road and did a couple of shots. However, the motivation to push and explore just wasn’t there.  I thought somehow it just didn’t have the same feel as I did back in Iceland. Perhaps I was trying out a “Finn Beale” style; perhaps it was because of the cloudy weather which gave a soft diffused lighting in the woods that I felt it didn’t work for me. Or perhaps it’s just “Finn Beales” style wasn’t cut out for me.

on post process, I thought cross-processing would fit the mood of the image, but still, I didn’t quite like it. Maybe it’s a little too green, I don’t know.

 

Post Process

_MG_5437Edit_BA2On post process, heavy editing wasn’t required. Though I could have cleaned out some of the details out the foreground but I liked the mess of details to be authentic. Just the usual method of opening up shadows and decreasing highlights and that was good enough.

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1. This image is a result of blending three exposures together. I didn’t really had any visual concepts of the end results, after blending the images together with some adjustment curves. I thought it was nothing much.

2. I then applied the detail extractor filter in camera Effex pro to push more details out of the camera raw, and the pro contrast filter to compliment the amount of raw details being forced out. This is when the image truly pops out. Then I did a bit of colour adjustment to remove the colour cast and clone out some unwanted details and repaired the mirror edges to make it neater.

3. Then I did a bit of colour adjustment to remove the colour cast and clone out some unwanted details and repaired the mirror edges to make it neater.

Conclusion

Bringing out a mirror cube out for the shoot, it was quite a fun experience to work with. It’s something I would not normally do when I shoot landscapes as it was more of me trying my luck and see how it turns out. Have I got any failures in my shoot? definitely yes, I did in fact considered most of it a failure on the ground because of the ideal weather condition and timing at the location did nut turn to my favor, however the some of the images turned out to be surprisingly strong after post processing that I actually want to kick myself for not continuing it when I was on location. With those images, I could easily say I got lucky but was it a lucky shot? I think no. Sure the landscapes were magnificent, to begin with. The rugged terrain is still considered an exotic place for many people. The weather condition may be unpredictable. However, I still accessed the situation on location and tried to make full use of the time while I was there. I experimented with camera angles and composition in hopes to increase my chance of successful shots. Not all was lost and some of the images turned out good unexpectedly.

This series has enabled to me to learn that I could plan my shot as much as I want with all the concepts and ideas and visuals built in my head. But there are some shots that come naturally from constant experimentation and when I least expected it. It’s a bit like “the decisive moment”. Although I did not achieve the vibrant colourful visual which I hoped to get out from, but it does fulfil the “provocative landscape” research I had set out to explore. I think I could still bring the mirror tiles back to Singapore after graduation and try it out with cityscapes. Combine it with my vivid approach in photography and perhaps I might get interesting results with it over there.

In-depth Development: Utopian/ Dystopian World

I loved Chinese New Year gatherings. As an international student living abroad, it is those occasions where we would invite other students to come together for a hearty meal around the table and talk about our uni works and the subjects we were concerned about in our craft practices. I went on to share about some of the initial challenges I faced as I wanted to collaborate with as many artists for my next project, but were faced with conflicts in our schedules and that reviewing my archive took a while due to my large collection of images.

I had the opportunity to meet up with Fahim, a year two visual Effects student where our discussion developed into a possible collaboration between Visual Effects and photography since they all fall under the same Multimedia spectrum and thus share some similarities. The idea of Utopian and dystopian world stems out from the research for my dissertation on The provocative landscape and wanted to explore it with other like-minded artists. I was considering how landscape photography can be alleviated into something greater and his insights about images of landscapes were used as a source of references and inspiration by artists in game environmental concept designs; another area which I have never considered at the time.

Fahim proposed the idea of using my photography to create a moving image piece with 3D Matte painting techniques. In the sense, I head out to shoot the images as I would normally do and he would assemble the useful assets to build a moving image in After Effects and Premiere pro. Fahim was able to find suitable images from my Scotland and Iceland trips and work things out. We agreed to go for an utopian-fantasy-esque approach for our collaboration project. Other challenges include compositing the elements together seamlessly in photoshop and with manage camera movement works in After effects.

One prime example of the matte painting technique was the visual effects of “The Avengers” by Industrial Light and Magic (ILM), where scenes were constructed using 3D animations and video footages.

References

 

For our project, I was looking at Filip Dujardin’s structures in landscapes and his style of digital manipulation, as well as Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs – The great Unreal collection. They form part of my research on provocative landscapes. Meanwhile, Fahim was looking at the matte painting works of Jacek Irzykowski and Stoimen Dimitrov

 

As far as communication is concerned, we managed to communicate professionally and periodically to work out solutions and meet the challenges we faced. The wealth of assets I was able to provide was due to our constant rapport in understanding each other’s needs and limitations in our crafts, as well as the research both of us has done to inform each other’s works

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After-Thoughts

(This work is still in progress)

Although this was my only successful collaborative project, I have discovered there are other fields of industries where landscape imagery can be relevant (other than car adverts) – the game industry in areas of environmental concept designs, as well as the movie industry. As game artists and visual effects artist have exemplified using references of elements of landscapes to build an imaginary landscape, it is possible to interpret a provocative landscape in the form of a utopian/dystopian world.

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Check out Farhim’s side of updates about this project here.

Industry

In regards to the Singapore industry, game design and Visual effects companies are more prevalent there than car advertising. There is  LucasFilm and there is  ILM branch in Singapore. These are the prominent ones.

Singapore doesn’t make cars (in fact the government has been trying to discourage the rise of vehicles by increasing its value to an exorbitant amount and introducing various methods to discourage new drivers from buying one).

Various trips were all necessary to fulfil my chance of a smooth journey in Iceland. Planning for this trip started six months prior to the flying over and there were many factors I had to consider.

Initially, I had planned to go during the study break in December as there was the cheapest window period. I looked for photography students who would be interested in coming on board with me. I needed two more people so as to share costs and also I could carry more camera equipment out, such as the Pentax medium format. There had been interested parties but on and off. Due to the delay, I had to push it back to February with another cheap window period. Unfortunately, everyone dropped out as it was still too expensive for them. This impeded my original plans as it would be extremely challenging for me to do everything by myself.

In this post, I share my research and thoughts as I plan for the biggest trip of my life for my photography project.

Research

When I plan a photography trip, experience has taught me that the best order of consideration should be as follows:

Flight (Window Period) > Locations > Weather > Distance > Transportation > Schedule > Accommodation > Food

The first factor is always budget: how can I get the most out and yet in the most budget way? This became the anchor in deciding pretty much everything. The second factor is contingency plans. Given the unpredictability of the weather changes in Iceland, it is important to have a contingency plan in case of road closures due to bad weather.

A large part of my planning for all my trips has been based on the places I wanted to visit and depending on the feasibility of the road of advancement. Understanding sunrise, sunset and moonrise timing and positions were also crucial for my planning as I need to allocate sufficient time to reach the location and getting to places where I should be at. I plan out a schedule, rearranging locations based on the distance from one location to another. From there I will consider the mode of transportation; is public transportation or car rental more economical?

Last but not least, I will look at accommodations and food. I would be out most of the day and return back only for sleep, so backpacking hostels with bed & breakfast are usually sufficient for me. I tend to read up a lot of articles and guides, such as travel tips from LonelyPlanet and 5 ways to travel Iceland on a budget from Singapore for relevant information so as to get those best advice out.

Locations

Planning locations in Iceland took the longest time out for me. There are so many places to visit, but it is not possible to see everything as I am constraint by the limited time period I have. So I will have to be careful with my selection.

As I research for articles, I looked at various travel guides, around the ring road guides, off the beaten path guides, and even photography workshops that promote certain locations such as ice caves tours. Some articles talk about visiting Iceland during winter time.

At some point, I was contemplating to splurge the money on helicopter rides. Eventually, I decided to explore just the southern region of the Ring road without much of those tour packages. I opted for a winter tour, partially because it was the low season and I wanted to see the Northern Lights for the first time of my life.

Uridafoss before strong winter wind by Philip K on 500px.com
Uridafoss before strong winter wind by Philip K
Lava Light flow by Josselin Cornou on 500px.com
Seljanlandsfoss – Lava Light flow by Josselin Cornou
Gljúfrabúi by Malte Reinhardsson on 500px.com
Gljúfrabúi by Malte Reinhardsson
Man and Nature by Jesús M. García on 500px.com
Kvernufoss – Man and Nature by Jesús M. García
... just landed by Kenneth Schoth on 500px.com
Sólheimasandur – just landed by Kenneth Schoth
Fairy Tale Canyon by W&AC Visual Arts on 500px.com
Fjaðrárgljúfur – Fairy Tale Canyon by W&AC Visual Arts
Burning Icebergs by Hans-Peter Deutsch on 500px.com
Jökulsárlón – Burning Icebergs by Hans-Peter Deutsch
Iceland by Fredi Lienhardt on 500px.com
Vestrahorn – Iceland by Fredi Lienhardt

Weather

For weather, I looked at multiple websites explaining the conditions around the time of my visit (ie, February climate). This article guide about the climate weather in Iceland was particularly useful. For weather forecast, I cross-referenced BBC weather with Icelandic Met office and AccuWeather.

A week before my flight, Iceland was also affected by Storm Doris, with record-breaking snowfall in Reykjavík. This posed a huge concern for me, as flights were grounded and roads closed due to heavy snow. I monitored the situation carefully. Fortunately, the snow around the golden circle had been cleared a week later, just in time for my travels.

Transportation & Driving in Iceland

Driving in Iceland was yet another big area of information for me to digest. This was because I am not familiar with the road conditions in Iceland: I have never driven a left-hand orientation drive before and in such long distance & rugged terrain.bI looked and many articles on tips in driving in Iceland and the many car rental companies that offer cheap rentals.

Vetta Media talks offer tips about driving and car rental, iheartreykjavik shares their experience driving around the ring road with a really useful google map with pins. in one guide, Tripcreator gave tips on the driving conditions in Iceland and on gas stations. of all the advice I have gathered, Vegagerðin gave the most up to date road conditions in Iceland, and most drivers rely on its app.

I chose the regular 2WD car over 4WD because I figured technically there isn’t really any advantage of 4WD over a 2WD in terms of accessibility since F roads require a 4WD, and F roads are closed during winter. I could also drive 2WD cars on gravel roads.

Other than driving, I had to figure my way from Norwich to London Luton Airport (As there aren’t any direct buses), from Iceland International Airport to Reykjavik and back home to Norwich.

Accommodation

I went with Hosteling International, planning out different locations around Iceland and hoping that I wouldn’t be too exhausted from the long distance drive. The car rental includes the full premium insurance. normally I wouldn’t go for this in my other travels, but for this trip, it is extremely important.

Equipment & Insurance

One of the reasons I saved up my money and invested myself with good camera equipment was to prepare myself for the trip to Iceland. It was a dream trip for me which stems before making plans studying in the UK. Some equipment I could not afford before my Iceland trip were telephoto lenses, another camera body, GoPro camera, and perhaps a drone camera. some of which fortunately, I was able to borrow from the school facility centre.

As I was travelling alone, my baggage weight becomes a considerable factor. Although initially I wanted to bring a Pentax medium format, but I was unable to due limited manpower. I got insurance for two pieces of camera equipment that were not mine. To be honest, the insurance cost more than me (my travel insurance). Hence, my gears for this trip are as follows:

Canon 5D Mk III | Canon 16-35mm F2.8 | Canon 24-105mm F4.0 | Canon 50mm F1.4 | Canon 5Ds | Canon 70-200mm F4.0 | Dual camera strap | mini torch light | Lee GND filter kit | Mirror Panes

Schedule

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 00.59.44 After many months of planning, this was the schedule I went with, which includes time, location, cars, and hostels in a particular area. Eventually, I went with HI hostels for the accommodation plus car rental package. Anything else in between, I had to figure out what the transition from the airport to my hostel, and back, etc.

After many months of planning, this was the schedule I went with, which includes time, location, cars, and hostels in a particular area. Eventually, I went with HI hostels for the accommodation plus car rental package. Anything else in between, I had to figure out what the transition from the airport to my hostel, and back, etc.

 

References https://iceland-photo-tours.com/north-iceland-photography-workshop/ https://breathewithus.com/iceland-road-trip-ultimate-guide/ http://unlockingkiki.com/beaten-path/ https://www.dreamingandwandering.com/2014/12/30/blue-ice-caves-in-iceland-explore-the-wonder-of-nature/ http://www.tripzilla.com/iceland-budget-travel-guide-story/53376 https://guidetoiceland.is/travel-info/climate-weather-and-northern-lights-in-iceland http://en.vedur.is/weather/forecasts/areas/http://www.accuweather.com/en/is/reykjavik/190390/weather-forecast/190390 http://www.vettasmedia.com/vm/iceland-driving-car-rental/ http://www.iheartreykjavik.net/2014/12/drive-it-yourself-the-golden-circle/ https://blog.tripcreator.com/your-ultimate-guide-to-driving-in-iceland/ http://www.road.is/about/news/nr/15361 https://blog.tripcreator.com/gas-stations-in-iceland/#gas-prices-currency-unit-converter http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/39104230/iceland-gets-record-breaking-snowfall-and-the-pictures-are-amazing http://icelandreview.com/news/2017/02/27/record-snow-reykjavik

 

My visual editing process was inspired by a Thai (presumably) a photographer, by the name of CoolBieЯe’s Folio on his facebook page, who had put up some visuals to explain the editing process of his images. The comments section were all in Thai and I do not understand what they were saying, but it garnered a lot of positive responses and I thought it was a good way to show people how the final result of an image was achieved and the thoughts behind.

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It’s a bit similar to a print map in the analogue photography, where it the photographer make markings on the image on a piece of paper as to how he/she wants to interpret on the negatives. The photographer would then go on to develop the negatives. The difference is that I’m editing my photos digitally and it is much faster compare to the analogue process.

I decided to try it out for my BA3a. The downside was that it required extra effort to prepare the screenshot images and compile them into a single image. However, I had found it to be extremely helpful in illustrating my thought processes for my edits.

Hence I will be doing it again for BA3b, on selected images.